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Posts for: June, 2017

By Central Jersey Dental Arts
June 27, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  

You've probably heard of a dental implant, but maybe you're not exactly sure what it is composed of. It’s a modern dental device that hasDental Implant helped countless people who have missing teeth renew and restore their smiles. Learn the three parts that make up a dental implant so that you'll know what to expect in advance of your procedure at Central Jersey Dental Arts in Piscataway, NJ.

The Titanium Implant
The part of the dental implant unit that sits below the gumline is made of titanium and resembles a tiny screw. Titanium is a material that is biocompatible and integrates well with bone tissue. Through a process called osseointegration, the tissue in your jaw combines with the titanium implant and holds it firmly in place. It resembles the shape of the root of a natural tooth that is located at the front of your mouth but can also be used to replace back molars.

The Abutment
Once the implant heals below the gumline, there needs to be a post that can hold the crown in place. Your Piscataway dentist will install a tiny device on top of the titanium implant called an abutment. It forms the middle part of the restoration and won’t be visible to others. The abutment looks like a tooth that has been prepared to receive a crown and is made of metal or porcelain material.

The Permanent Crown
The crown is the final part of a dental implant. It can be made of a metal material or ceramic resin, but the best-looking crown is made of high-quality porcelain. Your dentist will design the crown based on the shape of the abutment and the open space between the adjacent teeth. Once ready, it is either screwed or bonded to the abutment to complete the restoration. The crown will likely last up to 15 years before it has to be replaced.

Dental Implants Can Improve Your Smile
All of the parts of a dental implant eventually come together to make your smile stronger, healthier and more attractive. Call (732) 981-1040 today for a consultation with Dr. Nainesh Desai at his Piscataway, NJ, dentist office.


By Central Jersey Dental Arts
June 25, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  
ScreworCementWhichisBestforAttachingYourImplantCrown

If you’re in the initial planning stages for a dental implant, you may already be encountering a number of options to consider. One that may come up is how the visible crown will attach to the metal implant imbedded in the bone.

Generally speaking, implants are composed of two parts: a metal post most often made of titanium placed into the bone that serves as the “root” for the new tooth; and a visible, life-like crown made of dental porcelain that attaches to an abutment on the titanium post. The crown can be attached in one of two ways: either with a small screw through the biting surface of the crown into a receiving hole in the abutment or cemented to it.

The major advantage of a screwed crown is that it allows for easy removal of the crown if needed. While the titanium post can often last a lifetime, porcelain crowns more often need repair or replacement since they receive the brunt of the biting forces in the mouth. A screw-attached crown is much easier to remove than a cemented one.

On the other hand, screwed crowns have a small access hole that must be restored with a tooth-colored filling to help the crown appear natural. This isn’t too great an issue with back teeth but does make achieving a natural appearance in the front more difficult. Cemented crowns look more like a natural tooth and are thus more flexible in achieving the desired appearance.

Besides the possibility the cement may cause gum inflammation or bone loss, the chief detraction from cemented crowns is the difficulty in removing them. Crowns are often damaged in this process so it’s highly likely it will have to be replaced rather than repaired. It’s possible to use weaker cement, but this raises the risk of the crown coming loose at some point from the abutment.

As we plan for your implant, we’ll discuss which type of attachment will work best for you, depending on the tooth to be replaced and other conditions with your oral health. The end result, though, should be the same — a new, natural-looking tooth that serves you well for many years to come.

If you would like more information on dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “How Crowns Attach to Implants.”


By Central Jersey Dental Arts
June 10, 2017
Category: Oral Health
NoahGallowaysDentallyDangerousDancing

For anyone else, having a tooth accidentally knocked out while practicing a dance routine would be a very big deal. But not for Dancing With The Stars contestant Noah Galloway. Galloway, an Iraq War veteran and a double amputee, took a kick to the face from his partner during a recent practice session, which knocked out a front tooth. As his horrified partner looked on, Galloway picked the missing tooth up from the floor, rinsed out his mouth, and quickly assessed his injury. “No big deal,” he told a cameraman capturing the scene.

Of course, not everyone would have the training — or the presence of mind — to do what Galloway did in that situation. But if you’re facing a serious dental trauma, such as a knocked out tooth, minutes count. Would you know what to do under those circumstances? Here’s a basic guide.

If a permanent tooth is completely knocked out of its socket, you need to act quickly. Once the injured person is stable, recover the tooth and gently clean it with water — but avoid grasping it by its roots! Next, if possible, place the tooth back in its socket in the jaw, making sure it is facing the correct way. Hold it in place with a damp cloth or gauze, and rush to the dental office, or to the emergency room if it’s after hours or if there appear to be other injuries.

If it isn’t possible to put the tooth back, you can place it between the cheek and gum, or in a plastic bag with the patient’s saliva, or in the special tooth-preserving liquid found in some first-aid kits. Either way, the sooner medical attention is received, the better the chances that the tooth can be saved.

When a tooth is loosened or displaced but not knocked out, you should receive dental attention within six hours of the accident. In the meantime, you can rinse the mouth with water and take over-the-counter anti-inflammatory medication (such as ibuprofen) to ease pain. A cold pack temporarily applied to the outside of the face can also help relieve discomfort.

When teeth are broken or chipped, you have up to 12 hours to get dental treatment. Follow the guidelines above for pain relief, but don’t forget to come in to the office even if the pain isn’t severe. Of course, if you experience bleeding that can’t be controlled after five minutes, dizziness, loss of consciousness or intense pain, seek emergency medical help right away.

And as for Noah Galloway:  In an interview a few days later, he showed off his new smile, with the temporary bridge his dentist provided… and he even continued to dance with the same partner!

If you would like more information about dental trauma, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Trauma & Nerve Damage to Teeth” and “The Field-Side Guide to Dental Injuries.”